Print Page | Close Window

Relentless, 2009

Printed From: Dkoontz.com/Moped2.org/Personal-Freedom.org
Category: Writer/Book Forums
Forum Name: Dean Koontz book reviews
Forum Discription: Place to post reviews of Koontz books
URL: http://www.neo-forum.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=13121
Printed Date: January/28/2020 at 1:13am


Topic: Relentless, 2009
Posted By: dnurse64
Subject: Relentless, 2009
Date Posted: June/21/2009 at 2:26pm
Spoilers but not major:


This is another one of my favorite DK books. I also read it twice back to back just because I loved all that the characters had to say. The humor engaged me immediately. I think that Cubby, Penny, Milo, and Lassie(the dog) are my all time favorite Koontz family unit. I found the story of a writer that is manipulated and terrorized by an evil critic so thrilling. I can't stand mean critics with their hidden agendas in the first place and this just ended up being so much fun. Milo has to be the coolest genius kid. I enjoyed Cubby's observation of the literary publishing world and the critics affect on it. Cubby's insights into celebrity self promotion, internet, online encyclopedias, philosophy of writing and art, use of fiction, importance of books, survivalists, gun ownership, and views on our current political situation as revealed in the California real estate taken over by the government were so easy for me to relate to and identify with. Plus Cubby just helps you understand people in a way you might not have before you read this book.
I laughed so much at this book. It was one of my best reading experiences. Those scenes when the dog Lassie ends up in all those unique places were just so cool. Especially the way Cubby and Milo handled it.

The reveal into Cubby's childhood experience was just heartbreaking. I was so touched.

The whole story worked for me. The characters, the plot, the twists, the villian, EVERYTHING. The villian had me at "Doom."

World War Waxx was one of the best. I loved this Koontz family so much.


With 5 stars being the highest rating of course.

-------------
I'm inclined to believe in parallel worlds filled with dark bound Snow and Odd adventures.




Replies:
Posted By: GeneB
Date Posted: July/06/2009 at 9:50am
This is THE Koontz board and only one review of his latest book?? We are sinking fast, huh?
I've not read it.

-------------
Ask me about DEAN KOONTZ Forum T-shirts. Cool.



Posted By: breezit
Date Posted: July/06/2009 at 12:25pm
I'm surprised Snowman didn't post one of his legendary reviews.

-------------
"In the real world as in dreams, nothing is quite what it seems. Dean Koontz



Posted By: christophersnow
Date Posted: July/06/2009 at 4:19pm
lol Are my reviews really legendary? I know I spent my time on the YHBTM review. I promised I would write a review for this book last weekend but never did it. I'm getting so lazy. Oh well. I did rank it 11th.

-------------
"It had to be said. The world is perishing from an orgy of self-sacrificing." - Howard Roark
Dean Koontz= Always working!


Posted By: GeneB
Date Posted: July/13/2009 at 8:59am
11th ??? Wow, some good hallucinogenics over there?? I picked it up at Walmart, thumbed thru the big print mono-sentence paragraphs, then put it back down.

-------------
Ask me about DEAN KOONTZ Forum T-shirts. Cool.



Posted By: pattirose
Date Posted: July/13/2009 at 9:05am
not again?   

-------------
"Where there is cake, there is hope. And there is always cake" - Life Expectancy


Posted By: masha99
Date Posted: July/16/2009 at 7:06am
So it's not an epic. It's still one of his best in quite a while.

-------------
Maybe all you've got is what you get to... -- Brad Cotter
Pity for the guilty is treason to the innocent -- Ayn Rand/Terry Goodkind


Posted By: christophersnow
Date Posted: July/16/2009 at 8:07am
Originally posted by GeneB GeneB wrote:

11th ??? Wow, some good hallucinogenics over there?? I picked it up at Walmart, thumbed thru the big print mono-sentence paragraphs, then put it back down.


Actually, the print size is way smaller compared to his other recent books. More lines per page as well. Probably not as epic as Lightning, but I can hardly fault it for that. Brevity sometimes does work.

-------------
"It had to be said. The world is perishing from an orgy of self-sacrificing." - Howard Roark
Dean Koontz= Always working!


Posted By: SlimMackenzie
Date Posted: July/21/2009 at 2:17pm
THERE ARE SOME SPOILER POINTS HERE. READ AT YOUR OWN RISK!


Well, I pretty much agree with what dnurse had to say about this book. You can definitely tell DK has found his roots.

Here are my likes: The characters are phenomenal. These were some of his best characters to date. The plot was original and very entertaining. I didn't want this book to end. He didn't go overboard with the dog this time. His last few "dog" books got out of hand regarding the dogs abilities. This dog was kept low key (for DK anyway). The villian was the best villian since Roy Miro (Dark Rivers of the Heart). Ruthless.

When the story halted, and dove into the past for the dad, it reminded me of the reason I started reading DK in the first place. Great dialogue between characters, especially between Milo and his parents.

Here are my dislikes: The ending. The story built and built through hundreds of pages, then came to a too-fast conclusion in the final chapter. I guess I was expecting more of an explanation, especially since the book took a sci-fi turn.

Waxx was part of a "clan" that consisted of miltia. I thought that was a great part of the story, but who were they? Where did they come from? How did a book critic get involved with the likes of such people? I know his mother was the "leader", but I never got an explanation in that regard.

So, in conclusion, I must say I enjoyed the book immensely. Out of the 60 or so DK books that I have read, this is a top 20. His last 5 books rank 46, 47, 48, 49, and 50, respectively. So, this was refreshing. Like I said, he touched on some of the old DK. The DK we all have grown fond of.

-------------
The other night I went to a fight and a hockey game broke out.
-Rodney Dangerfield


Posted By: dnurse64
Date Posted: July/22/2009 at 4:19am
SPOILERS:
**************************


I'm happy for you that you enjoyed reading it!

The book doesn't really go into the origin of the agency. Zazu Waxx does give info that the agency has access to the "unlimited funds of the federal treasury." I'm taking that it goes at least 50 years back when she was discussing the "new science of designing culture" and the "post humanity movement." It would make sense that she raised her son to be a critic just for this purpose of fixing what she sees as wrong with culture. She wants it to stay on track with the vision of Rousseau and she admires Shelly, Marx, Freud, Neitzsche, Tolstoy, Bertrand Russell and Sartre. Cubby states that although these people may be geniuses they "were madmen. And their contributions to the world were...irrationality, chaos, excuses for mass murder." But Zazu believes and tells Cubby that "They form the opinions of the elite ruling classes. Then artists and writers must, with their work, carry the message of their superiors to the masses. Which you have not done, Mr. Greenwich." I thought that she raised Shearman to help destroy artists like Cubby who are opposite of her vision and philosophy for the world. She also states before she dies that there are 12,000 members of the agency.

The ending wasn't too abrupt for me. I'm up for a quick ending even with loose ends. The idea that the agency still exists and Cubby's family has to go into hiding flows into the idea of the last paragraph of the book. The last paragraph leaves us with the thought that although evil is relentless, people like Shearman Waxx are not. Because love, friendship, family, faith, the human spirit, the human heart, and time are also relentless and these will win out in the end.

How about how Shearman Waxx died!? That was abrupt and unexpected for me. Justice is served in an ironic way.

-------------
I'm inclined to believe in parallel worlds filled with dark bound Snow and Odd adventures.



Posted By: SlimMackenzie
Date Posted: July/22/2009 at 7:05am
Yeah, the way WAXX died was surprising. I thought he would go out in some horrific way.

-------------
The other night I went to a fight and a hockey game broke out.
-Rodney Dangerfield


Posted By: breezit
Date Posted: July/28/2009 at 3:35pm
I read it, and thought it was just okay. Much better paced than Koontz's last few books. Lots of funny dialogue, especialy about the book industry.   

But in the end, this book reminded me too much of THE GOOD GUY -- a lot of familiar characters dealing with familiar situations that Koontz has written about better in other novels. I also found the ending disappointing, a pretty common problem with Koontz's more recent work.

This is probably a 6.5/10.

-------------
"In the real world as in dreams, nothing is quite what it seems. Dean Koontz



Posted By: FinalExam
Date Posted: August/26/2009 at 1:12pm
This book had potential but Koontz totally botched it. The section where he goes to his "so eccentric they can't be anything but fictional characters" in-laws and their boobytrapped hallway made me think Indiana Jones would come running through with a giant boulder chasing him, that stopped me dead in my tracks just when I was getting into the story. Then the story picked up again only to have one of the dumbest most unsatisfying endings ever. I am so f*#king sick of Koontz and his anti-climactic endings. It is refreshing on occassion to have a sudden abrupt ending that isn't dragged out, but all Kootnz does these days is build and bulid and build and then totally throw away the climax in a quick two pages. He gives us no real information about this "agency", and the dialogy of ZuZu is so ridiculously cheesy that I thought she should have a handlebar mustache and twirl it. And it's over just like that, after all that great building up to the conclusion, he just sort of discards it. It feels like he doesn't know how to close a book anymore and just tries to get it over with so he can move on to the next thing. And the part where he reveals that someone is going to get shot and die and life "will never be the same"...King uses that trick a lot, and don't kill me King-haters, but when king uses it he doesn't cheat you, he goes for the balls. As soon as Koontz used it, I knew it would be a cheat, and the person would die and come back. Then the cheat he uses is f#*king borrowed from Seize the Night for Christ's sake. koontz has a lot of older books I adore and I will always love him for those and gladly discuss them, but I think I'm through with him as far as new releases.

-------------
We are not strangers to ourselves, we only try to be. --Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz


Posted By: withpatience200
Date Posted: August/28/2009 at 9:12pm
So I opened this book, read about 4 pages, breathed a sigh of relief, and thought to myself Thank god he finally wrote a funny, fast paced, old style book again. I found great humor in this story. I was stuck to my seat reading it.
Then around the last 3rd of the story I got pretty nervous I actually put the book down, and read a Terry Goodkind book. I can not remember exactly what it was that stopped me from finishing it right away. I just know that I could see that things were getting sloppy. I think it was around the time they left her parents. Well after finishing Goodkinds book, I went back and read the rest of Relentless and I just can not believe that he would do this. I feel kind of the way you feel when a great book (like Half Blood Prince) is made into a major motion picture, and then ruined.   Like some idiot in editing decided that all of the important stuff that makes the story great is left out just so lazy people who do not want to think deep, or strive to understand struggle will enjoy the story.
I have been wondering if some publishing company told DK to lighten the mood, or dumb things down, or maybe he is just trying to write a book that some dumb moviemaker will take a look at and see it as a major motion picture. This had that kind of only looking at the surface kind of feel that most movies have now.
I wish he would work strictly on Odd and Snowman, Get them out of the way, and then go ahead and change his genre all together. Start writing Christian fiction, or something that interests him more than this genre seems to right now.
Though I have not read Frank 3 yet. So we will see.
BTW you can tell more and more that he has never had a child. What are the statistics for children being super genius. Sometime I would like to see an author put a kid in a story and have the kid be a stubborn, in the way, make situations more difficult to survive, normal kid. It would impress me just a bit more than kids who talk like adults and are way smarter than its parents.


-------------
With luck my patience will never run out before I do


Posted By: FinalExam
Date Posted: August/29/2009 at 2:36am
Yes, I agree about the children thing, if you judge fiction, every other child is a genius.

It seems almost to me that Koontz gets all caught up in having these people chased and tormented by some nefarious group, but he doesn't give any thought as to what this group is or WHY they are chasing the main characters. Then he gets to the end, realizes he has to throw some explanation in, but in order to cover up that he didn't really plan that, he just speeds through it.

-------------
We are not strangers to ourselves, we only try to be. --Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz


Posted By: dnurse64
Date Posted: August/29/2009 at 3:34am
Originally posted by dnurse64 dnurse64 wrote:

SPOILERS:
**************************


I'm happy for you that you enjoyed reading it!

The book doesn't really go into the origin of the agency. Zazu Waxx does give info that the agency has access to the "unlimited funds of the federal treasury." I'm taking that it goes at least 50 years back when she was discussing the "new science of designing culture" and the "post humanity movement." It would make sense that she raised her son to be a critic just for this purpose of fixing what she sees as wrong with culture. She wants it to stay on track with the vision of Rousseau and she admires Shelly, Marx, Freud, Neitzsche, Tolstoy, Bertrand Russell and Sartre. Cubby states that although these people may be geniuses they "were madmen. And their contributions to the world were...irrationality, chaos, excuses for mass murder." But Zazu believes and tells Cubby that "They form the opinions of the elite ruling classes. Then artists and writers must, with their work, carry the message of their superiors to the masses. Which you have not done, Mr. Greenwich." I thought that she raised Shearman to help destroy artists like Cubby who are opposite of her vision and philosophy for the world. She also states before she dies that there are 12,000 members of the agency.

The ending wasn't too abrupt for me. I'm up for a quick ending even with loose ends. The idea that the agency still exists and Cubby's family has to go into hiding flows into the idea of the last paragraph of the book. The last paragraph leaves us with the thought that although evil is relentless, people like Shearman Waxx are not. Because love, friendship, family, faith, the human spirit, the human heart, and time are also relentless and these will win out in the end.

How about how Shearman Waxx died!? That was abrupt and unexpected for me. Justice is served in an ironic way.


I don't think it was "dumb downed" at all. Have either of you read about the philosophy of these guys that the Waxx group followed? If so, you can see how the entire book from beginning to end was built up around this idealism for the villians. Not just thrown in at the end. I can understand the book not being something you personally enjoyed but I think your missing some of points. I think DK's choices worked well. The kid was really cool. I love to read about genius kids especially how DK writes them. No, not a dumb book. I don't need a checklist of points to be covered at the end and explained to me either like the salt shaker. I loved the way it was played out and not because I'm too dumb to understand if DK decided to explain it, which he could've if he wanted to go that way. Not laziness, just a cool choice that was funny and made the scenes.

-------------
I'm inclined to believe in parallel worlds filled with dark bound Snow and Odd adventures.



Posted By: FinalExam
Date Posted: August/29/2009 at 4:55am
I respect that you enjoyed it, but to me it was more proof that Koontz does not write a story that pleases or satisfies me anymore. He obviously still has an audience out there, and more power to him, I'm just not that audience anymore.

-------------
We are not strangers to ourselves, we only try to be. --Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz


Posted By: masha99
Date Posted: August/31/2009 at 4:44pm
I agree with dnurse.This book raises some important philosophical points about art and culture. It takes an idea of "art is a weapon of ideology" and sees it to a logical conclusion. Certain views of art and culture will inevitably lead to chaos,destruction and violence. DK has brought this up before in Velocity, so the theme is not new to him.

Genius kids normally annoy me, but here the child is a symbol of hope for the future, so in the end I was happy he was very special. Also, it was refreshing to see parents who clearly have no clue on how to deal with their smart child, instead of the "perfect" parents in DK other books like for example Mr. Murder.

The villian getting killed quickly and easily is also one of DK trademaks. While it's not for everyone, I think it makes the point of evil being ultimately unimportant and not all-powerful.   

-------------
Maybe all you've got is what you get to... -- Brad Cotter
Pity for the guilty is treason to the innocent -- Ayn Rand/Terry Goodkind


Posted By: FinalExam
Date Posted: August/31/2009 at 11:50pm
Koontz's philisophical statements are taking over his books and eclipsing the stories now, in my opinion. And he presents these things in such over the top and ham-handed ways that there's no subtlty or artistry to them. Again, just my opinion. And what some call a "trademark" I call a "rut." If you do something every time I believe your writing becomes stale and you're not growing as a writer. Just my take on it.

-------------
We are not strangers to ourselves, we only try to be. --Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz


Posted By: masha99
Date Posted: September/01/2009 at 2:25am
Not to steer away from themain topic, but I just finished my re-read of The Fountainhead and I wonder if DK took some inspiration for Shearman Waxx from the critics in that book. I mean, if The Fountainhead was written today, by a writer with modern sensibilities, a character like Ellsworth Toohey would probably act through violence rather than manipulation to achieve his results.

By the way, withpatience, which Goodkind book were you reading? I haven't seen you post in the Goodkind thread.

-------------
Maybe all you've got is what you get to... -- Brad Cotter
Pity for the guilty is treason to the innocent -- Ayn Rand/Terry Goodkind


Posted By: TheFirTree
Date Posted: December/27/2009 at 1:10pm
.


Posted By: pattirose
Date Posted: August/17/2010 at 10:05am
I didn't think it was all that bad, it certainly wasn't great but I liked it better than any of the others he's written in the past few years.

I found it very hard suspending belief but overall I enjoyed reading it. I liked the survival stuff and I learnt what an isocoles stance was. 5/10



-------------
"Where there is cake, there is hope. And there is always cake" - Life Expectancy


Posted By: mark1970
Date Posted: August/26/2010 at 1:25am
I have to agree with you, I loved this book and didnt want it to end so when it did I thought the ending to quick and abrupt.



Print Page | Close Window