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Midnight, 1989

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dnurse64 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dnurse64 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/30/2010 at 4:30am
SPOILERS:


It was bound to happen. I finally read a DK book that I didn't have a great chemistry while reading. It's a good solid book but it conflicted with elements I need to completely enjoy a book. This is not a book that would hook me on DK if it was my first read of one of his novels. I'll comment first on what didn't go well with me then what aspects worked.

The villain Shaddock was extremely insane in a way that went over my head and left me feeling dazed and confused. I understand how his history as a child with the Native American Indian affected him and the later flashback effects of the drug the Indian gave him candy contributed to his insanity. Shaddock was young and but very smart. He later realized that he was being manipulated by the Indian for revenge against Shaddock's father but he still believed the Moonhawk destiny of greatness despite of his discovery that led to him killing the Indian. But I can see how Shaddock's relationship with his own father contributed to his megalomania.

I love stories with nanotechnology and artificial intelligence but I the Grey Goo hypothesis has never appealed to me. I wasn't attracted to it's end result in Greg Bear's novel BLOOD MUSIC either. I don't like when things turn into a "blob" and ooze around. Ha. All the scenes were very horrific. The way the victims merged with their computers was definitely written in a horrific way. Many scenes were very frightening. Especially when that one regressive was tapping on the window while Sam Booker was inside underneath the window.

I craved for more scenes between Sam and his son Scott. I was wishing that somehow Scott was there with his father in Moonlight Cove during the story. I was endeared to the similarity of Sam's relationship to his father with that of DK's own relationship with his dad. That was emotional.

I became attached to Loman's cause and was rooting for him to catch Shaddock. I wanted him to be the one that killed him. I was very satisfied that DK allowed him to conquer Shaddock as opposed to Sam Booker.

I was always perplexed with how an entire town would agree to this change of the "New People." It was so unappealing and I never related to how Shaddock could've sold the idea to all those who agreed to it. I'd run like hell from that injection!

I came away from the book reflecting on DK's point that he made through this story about mankind's desire to flee or avoid responsibility. That was a powerful lesson. It's a struggle I personally deal with and could relate to the importance of the message. I also think the idea of singularity where man merges with machine via nanotechnology and artificial intelligence is fascinating and very FRIGHTENING and how it will affect our humanity. I enjoyed how DK worked that into this book. There is a balance between logic and our emotions that is interdependent and connected to our "souls" (IMO regarding souls). He addressed this issue and I appreciated it. The ending was the BEST part. My desire to see Sam overcome his despair and start a relationship with his son was completely satisfied. I love DK's belief of how other people, family and friends, are so important in helping us get through this life, even though we are individuals who should take responsibility for ourselves, we truly can't do it all on our very own. We shouldn't turn so completely inward, addicted to artificial "machines" instead of cultivating relationships face to face with other human beings. That type of artificial bonding Scott had with death metal music is destructive and fed his alienation that his father was responsible in cultivating. Sam was right to intervene and jump into his son's life. Scott's reaction to Sam was realistic at the end.

Anyway, great ending. Sam, Scott, Tessa, Chrissie, Harry, and the dog Moose have a bright future together with each teaching and learning the power of hope over despair.



I'm inclined to believe in parallel worlds filled with dark bound Snow and Odd adventures.

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dnurse64 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dnurse64 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/30/2010 at 5:18am
Originally posted by dnurse64 dnurse64 wrote:

SPOILERS:

I was always perplexed with how an entire town would agree to this change of the "New People." It was so unappealing and I never related to how Shaddock could've sold the idea to all those who agreed to it. I'd run like hell from that injection!


I should clarify that I understand the entire town didn't initially agree to the injections and that the citizens were eventually forced to convert. Even though DK explained how the town was isolated from authorities, I just couldn't go with it. I was feeling the entire time "no way." For some reason my imagination wouldn't go there.
I'm inclined to believe in parallel worlds filled with dark bound Snow and Odd adventures.

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