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Brandon Sanderson

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dnurse64 View Drop Down
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    Posted: March/03/2010 at 5:02am





I'm hearing good things about this author, especially his book ELANTRIS. Here's information from Sanderson's site on it:

Awards:

ELANTRIS was Brandon's first published book. A stand-alone epic fantasy novel, the book won the Romantic Times award for best epic fantasy of 2005, was chosen by Barnes and Noble.com editors as the best fantasy or sf book of the year, and is forthcoming in fourteen languages (about half of which have been released as of September of 2007.)


Synopsis by Brandon:

It's always interesting to describe your book to people, since a novel like this—at 200,000 words—is going to mean very different things to different people. If you want a more straightforward explanation of what the book's about, read the Publisher's Weekly review below. If you want something more casual, read the prologue. If you want something between, read on!

Tor classifies this book as an epic fantasy. I'm not sure if that's actually the case. There is no quest in this book, nor is it about the end of the world. It takes place (as many of my books do) in one city, and is a mixture of political intrigue, interesting magic, and character dynamics.

The setting is the city of Elantris and the surrounding suburbs. There's a force in Arelon known as the Dor that randomly chooses people and grants them divine powers. Elantris was once the city of the gods, where anyone who was 'chosen' went to live. Ten years ago, the Elantrians lost their powers and caught a terrible disease instead. From that point on, Elantris became a prison city/contamination zone for any who caught that disease—for the Dor continues to choose people and curse them.

The book follows the experiences of three people as they interact with the people of Elantris. Raoden, a prince, catches the disease in chapter one and is thrown into the city by his own father. Sarene, Raoden's sight-unseen fiancee from a political treaty, arrives in the city and gets involved in schemes, troubles, and politics involving Elantris. Hrathen, a priest and missionary, is sent to convert the people of Arelon—and is told that if he fails, the people of the country will need to be killed instead.

The three stories intertwine as the truth of what happened to Elantris, and its inhabitants, ten years ago is unearthed.






Here's a review of Elantris by one of my favorite authors Orson Scott Card:

Orson Scott Card review:

Elantris is the finest novel of fantasy to be written in many years. Brandon Sanderson has created a truly original world of magic and intrigue, and with the rigor of the best science fiction writers he has made it real at every level.

What makes this novel unforgettable, however, is the magnificent characters he has created. True heroes who, in the face of adversity, find strength they did not know they had, make mistakes from whose consequences they do not shrink, and sacrifice to save what is worth loving in their world.

Best of all, the story is complete. Oh, there's room for a sequel - and I hope there'll be one. But this does not feel like "volume 1," with all the important questions yet to be answered. Sanderson brings off an impossibly complicated resolution only a few pages from the end of the book, and you finish the book satisfied.

Sanderson writes within a moral universe where people are rarely sure who the good guys and the bad guys might turn out to be. But the difference between good and evil is clear even though it's subtle and sometimes hard to find.

It's rare for a fiction writer to have much understanding of how leadership works, how communities form, and how love really takes root in the human heart. Sanderson is astonishingly wise.

I'm glad I didn't write this book. I'm not the least bit envious. Because if I had written it, I wouldn't have had the pleasure of letting it unfold before me as this story did, in all its ugliness and beauty and excitement and pain.







I'm inclined to believe in parallel worlds filled with dark bound Snow and Odd adventures.

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dnurse64 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dnurse64 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/03/2010 at 5:06am
I figured we need a thread on this author after a "commercial" I just saw plus he's on my TBR list. Many members seem to enjoy this author. I can't wait to read him.
I'm inclined to believe in parallel worlds filled with dark bound Snow and Odd adventures.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote brotheroddkins Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/03/2010 at 5:53am
I just started reading Elantris again. It is really good. And I read his last book Warbreaker, which was complete awesomeness. He is also finishing the Wheel of Time series. But anyway let me post the cover to The Way of Kings again:



Cover art by the phenomenal Michael Whelan.
Reading: The Shadow Rising by Robert Jordan & Urban Gothic by Brian Keene


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote brotheroddkins Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/03/2010 at 5:57am
Here is the synopsis for The Way of Kings from TOR:

Having twice reached the New York Times bestseller list, and even as he is brilliantly completing Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time®, Brandon Sanderson is constantly asked by readers and booksellers alike what his next project will be. Now, Tor is proud to present his answer, The Way of Kings, the first novel in a remarkable sequence every bit as ambitious and unique--and as satisfying and addictive--as The Wheel of Time.

The Way of Kings introduces the three protagonists who will be our windows on the strange and wondrous world of Roshar and the drama about to unfold there:
* Dalinar, the assassinated king’s brother and uncle of the new one, is an old soldier who is weary of fighting. He is plagued by dreams of ancient times and legendary wars, visions that may force him into a new role he could never have imagined.

* Kaladin, a highborn young man who has been brought low, indeed to the most miserable level of military slavery, and like Ben Hur must suffer and struggle to survive and rise again.

* Shallan, a naïve but brave and brilliant young woman who will do anything to save her impoverished noble house from ruin.

These are people we will come to know deeply and take to our hearts. But just as important to The Way of Kings is a fourth key “character,” the unique world of Roshar itself, a richly imagined setting as real as science fiction’s Dune, as unforgettable as epic fantasy’s Middle Earth. Through all the volumes of The Stormlight Archive, Brandon Sanderson will make Roshar a realm we are eager to visit.

What Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time has been to the fantasy genre for the last two decades, The Stormlight Archive will be to the next, and The Way of Kings is where it all begins.


And here is what Brandon had to say about the book last year on Barnes & Noble forums (more in depth):

I've told Tor that I want to release KINGS on a schedule of two books, followed by one book in another setting, then two more KINGS. The series of KINGS has been named The Stormlight Archive. (The Way of Kings is the name of the first volume.)

So I should be doing plenty of shorter series in between. We'll see how busy this all keeps me. I think I'd go crazy if I weren't allowed to do new worlds every now and again.

But, then, KINGS turned out very, very well. (The first book is complete as of yesterday.) What is it about? Well...I'm struggling to find words to explain it. I could easily give a one or two line pitch on my previous books, but the scope of what I'm trying with this novel is such that it defies my attempts to pin it down.

It happens in a world where hurricane-like storms crash over the land every few days. All of plant life and animal life has had to evolve to deal with this. Plants, for instance, have shells they can withdraw into before a storm. Even trees pull in their leaves and branches. There is no soil, just endless fields of rock.

According to the mythology of the world, mankind used to live in The Tranquiline Halls. Heaven. Well, a group of evil spirits known as the Voidbringers assaulted and captured heaven, casting out God and men. Men took root on Roshar, the world of storms, but the Voidbringers chased them there, trying to push them off of Roshar and into Damnation.

The voidbringers came against man a hundred by a hundred times, trying to destroy them or push them away. To help them cope, the Almighty gave men powerful suits of armor and mystical weapons, known as Shardblades. Led by ten angelic Heralds and ten orders of knights known as Radiants, men resisted the Voidbringers ten thousand times, finally winning and finding peace.

Or so the legends say. Today, the only remnants of those supposed battles are the Shardblades, the possession of which makes a man nearly invincible on the battlefield. The entire world, essentially, is at war with itself--and has been for centuries since the Radiants turned against mankind. Kings strive to win more Shardblades, each secretly wishing to be the one who will finally unite all of mankind under a single throne.

That's the backstory. Probably too much of it. (Sorry.) The book follows a young spearman forced into the army of a Shardbearer, led to war against an enemy he doesn't understand and doesn't really want to fight. It will deal with the truth of what happened deep in mankind's past. Why did the Radiants turn against mankind, and what happened to the magic they used to wield?

I've been working on this book for ten years now. Rather than making it easier to describe and explain, that has made it more daunting. I'm sure I'll get better at it as I revise and as people ask me more often.
Reading: The Shadow Rising by Robert Jordan & Urban Gothic by Brian Keene


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And with strange aeons even death may die.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pattirose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/03/2010 at 6:14am
Way of Kings sounds really good, I'm going to see if I can find a copy, thanks. I'll put this author on my tbr list.




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